Be a Friend – Read Stories Aloud

Listeners of any age are drawn into another world by an expressive reader, with a good book.

ReadingAloud2

Not everyone is a storyteller. We can, however, read books aloud with feeling. As a human experience, reading loud arouses curiosity and is essentially interactive, pleasure-able, and informative.

IMG_7958

Reading aloud fluently puts the life back into words on the page. It’s a step towards oral storytelling, creating a strong bond between reader and listener.

Grandadreads

Babies in the womb pick up voice vibrations at 16 weeks. Singing nursery rhymes and reading picture books to the baby from that time on … works! Oracy  – all that spoken interaction – is the vital foundation for literacy.

IMG_2780

Reading “with expression,” or fluently, is an acquired skill.  We learn by listening to a fluent reader who engages us, using the ‘melody’ (intonation) of their voice.

BeReadaloud

New research into young learners shows that listening to a text read aloud is more instructive than everyday talking – the imagination is stimulated, more parts of the brain “fire” at once, while memory, as well as vocabulary, increases.

IMG_0231

As my friend Naomi B. commented so eloquently, listening to stories

“helps them hear the language and its patterns, and eventually it will help them understand the structure and elements of a good story. I believe that growing up hearing stories all the time, every day, helps them recognise and appreciate the stories all around them, and it is much more likely that they will learn and love to create and tell stories of their own.”

Thank you, dear Friend

And,  just in case you have the time to watch a 9:29 min TedX talk

“Why We Should All Be Reading Aloud To Children | Rebecca Bellingham | Tedxyouth@Beaconstreet” YouTube. (9.29) Dec, 2015. Web. 29 Apr. 2016.

See also this week’s inspiring post ‘1-800-Viola Swamp’ in A Teacher’s Reflections by Jennie. Please click the link to learn the power of reading aloud in her Early Years classroom.

Reference:  REESE, Elaine. Tell Me a Story: Sharing Stories to Enrich Your Child’s Life. Auckland, OUP, 2013.

All text (except quote) and photos in this post by Meg (except B&W and second last image which are published with permission) are Australian Copyright protected. © 2017 Meg Philp

Story Twigs the Imagination! © Meg Philp

Advertisements

15 thoughts on “Be a Friend – Read Stories Aloud

  1. Sweet, Meg, and every word of it true! I’d like to add that, while everyone may not be a storyteller, reading to kids, even in utero, helps them hear the language and its patterns, and eventually it will help them understand the structure and elements of a good story. I believe that growing up hearing stories all the time, every day, helps them recognize and appreciate the stories all around them, and it is much more likely that they will learn and love to create and tell stories of their own.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Father and Son | What's (in) the picture?

  3. I can think back fifty years to my early elementary school days. Mrs. Chapman, my fourth grade teacher, would transform impossibly hot and humid afternoons into a shared adventure by taking the last half hour of the school day and reading chapter books to us. It was a treat to look forward to at the end of each day, and a sweet memory that stays with me. Just as I used to read every day and at bedtime to my children, now they read to me. Bea especially, when she comes home, shares the grownup novels she wants to ‘hook’ me into reading–in the car when I am driving, or when I’m cooking or otherwise working with my hands. Those are some of the sweetest moments to share, and of course they spark interesting conversations about the content and the presentation of the story she is sharing. Reading aloud is a gift that never stops giving!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s