Structure / Order: Weekly Photo Challenge

The challenge this week is ‘to share the structure of something that is typically overlooked.’

“What kind of flower is that?” I wonder, as I spy crumpled pink on the footpath.

“O, oh. Is it dead?” I zoom in.

A couple stops to find out what I’m photographing and before I can say anything to them about poisonous … , he’s picked up a broken branch to touch …

the spider … which grasps the proffered twig and hangs-on in mid-air, while being carried to a near-by tree.

Here it stays, held fast by eight skinny legs – an impressive structure!

Not really scared of spiders … am fascinated by their differences, their webs … their ingenuity and their persistence.

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Tiny spiders like these surely have a sense of humour –  ‘Moustache’ Spiders?

 

Structure

Story Twigs the Imagination! is a blog created by Meg Philp and Copyright © under Australian Law. 

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Plant Life: WPC

This week’s Photo Challenge ‘Elemental” had me casting my eyes heavenwards … and then down to the window-sill. Elements of fire, earth, water and air are all captured here, as a winter sun pours into the house.

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Simply put,  Planet Earth thrives because of plants. They provide food, oxygen, medicine, and products, as well as creating and preserving the soil.

There’s a potted history in the three flower types this little posy -Violas were herbal medicine used by the Greeks as early as 4th Century B.C. Edible Nasturtiums were found in Mexico and Peru and taken back to Spain by the Conquistadors in the 16th century.  Petunias were also discovered about the same time in Argentina. Scots explorer James Tweedie sent purple ones back to the Edinburgh Royal Botanic Gardens in the 1830s.

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Plant collecting expanded with the British Empire. Edinburgh’s ‘Physic’ gardens and Royal Botanic Gardens flourished from 1653 on.

The British ‘landed gentry’ arranged the education of their off-spring in birth order. Their first son, as heir, was destined for university or would study law,  as might their second son.  Other younger sons would go into the Priesthood, the Military or  (Dear me!) Trade and apprenticeships. By the 1800s, with the expansion of the sciences like Botany in the Age of Enlightenment, a dedicated few became plant explorers, travelling to exotic places, Asia, Australasia,  and the Americas, they brought back rare species for the gardens of the great estates, like Crarae Garden in Argyll, Scotland.  There, you may walk amongst Nepalese, Chinese and Tibetan trees and shrubs sent back by botanist Reginald Farrer.

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Camellia, member of the Tea Family from China.

There’s so much about plants that is taken for granted – more stories to tell … Just grow some, water them, care for them!

For more info about the Golden Age of Botany, see PlantExplorers.com. There you’ll find out about how other intrepid explorers battled the elements to bring back rare specimens … See Joseph Banks (1743-1820) who sailed with Captain Cook … or Scotsman  George Forrest (1873 – 1922) from Falkirk, who discovered over 1200 plants in China, Tibet and Burma and then introduced hundreds of them into western cultivation.

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Superfoods

See also this List of gardener-botanist explorers of the Enlightenment


Sources

DAVIES, Amanda.The History of the Petunia in “Thompson & Morgan” (Blog) Feb 12, 2016. Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

Pansy. Aggie Horticulture, Texas AgriLife Extension Series. Downloaded 10 August 2017

PlantExplorers.com; the Adventure is Growing. Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

PERRY, Leonard. (Dr.) Nasturtium; a favourite old-fashioned flower. in “The Green Mountain Gardener.” University of Vermont Extension, Dept of Plant and Soil Science. Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

‘Reginald Farrer.’Wikiwand. Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

Wallis, Patrick (and) Webb, Cliff. The Education and Training of of Gentry Sons in Early Modern England. ISE, London, (forthcoming). Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

Elemental

All text and photos by Meg.

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

This blog of text and images is Copyright © under Australian Law.

Delta Pattern: Weekly Photo Challenge

A challenge to find one photo to illustrate this topic. Oh my!

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OK. After heavy rain last month, I spotted this pattern in silt from a run-off on the footpath. It’s a water splash. Or was I looking down on the planet from space? Guess.

Delta

All text and photo by Meg.

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

This blog of text and images is Copyright © under Australian Law.

Passing Through: Weekly Photo Challenge

In,

over,

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through,

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(Oops! Missed some.)

and out.

Read this many years ago. Presume it’s from the Sufi tradition of teaching stories.

Years ago, a young backpacker set off travelling to new places.

Arriving in an distant city, he learned that a famous sage was speaking that night in the great hall. The young man decided to go along. An audience of over a thousand people heard the sage talk and many were as inspired as he was. They gathered outside in the square to talk late into the night about what they had heard and to plan their future.

Over the next two days, the traveller asked everyone he met how he might meet the sage in person. Three days later, he was taken to the place where the man had lived all his life. He rang the bell tentatively.

Stepping in the doorway, the young man noticed the home’s bare walls and basic furniture. The sage came forward and greeted him warmly. Together they sat by the fire to drink tea and talk.

After some hours, the traveller stood to thank his elder and bid him farewell. His host was curious to know what was had surprised him the most.

“You are so famous. People shower you with gifts. I expected you to live in grand style. ”

“You arrived with only a backpack!” retorted the sage.

“Yes, but I am only passing through,” muttered the young man.

“So am I,” replied his host.

Transient
All text and photos © Meg Philp are protected by Australian Copyright Law. If you wish to use any images. Please contact me thru Comments. Pass the story on. Thanks.

PS. And then there’s the song a Canadian teacher sang to me on the verandah of the Migrant Hostel in 1975 – the chorus is stuck in my mind.

 “Passing through, Passing through, … Glad that I ran into you, Tell the people that you saw me passing through.”

Google now tells me it was written by Richard Blakeslee and sung by Pete Seeger! … Learn something new every day!

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Stacks in Order: WPC

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Fuel chopped and stacked by Rob

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Flower head stacked – Hydrangea

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Fibonacci stack – 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 …

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Feather stack – overlay

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Fern stack – spiral

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Kids heard stacks of folktales told that day.

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Fleecy stack – Flock

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Famous Fiction stack.

(… getting a bit carried away!)

Puzzle story

A man had to ferry a wolf, a goat and a cabbage across a river. The only boat was so small, it could just hold the man and one other thing. In what order did he manage to get everything to the other side, without the wolf eating the goat, or the goat eating the cabbage? Clue – He made seven trips.

Order

For more on Fibonnaci

All text and photos by Meg.

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

This blog of text and images is copyright under Australian Law.

 

Flicker: WPC Evanescent

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Soft , warm breezes move across the bay.

A silver fish cascade is pulled up at the end of the pier: an unfair end.

Here and gone – evanescent flicker.

A Norse myth ‘The Apples of Immortality’ tells how their gods could live forever.

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When the gods of Asgard began to show signs of ageing, they simply sought out the goddess Idunn and asked for one of the golden apples she kept in a wooden box.  From the first bite, aches and pains disappeared; youthful looks and vigour were regained. Of course, it’s a story where the trickster cunning of Loki thwarts all their ‘best laid plans.’

Have just read Neil Gaiman’s latest book where he retells selected Norse Myths. I find his interpretation of these tales refreshing, especially with regard to some of our current leaders – politicians, celebrities, moguls and the like.

Check out the SMH review. I’d add that all the myths involving the trickster, are standouts eg. The Children of Loki, The Death of Baldur, The Apples of Immortality, The Master Builder.

Loki has a distinctive kind of evanescence. You have to be quick to catch or confront Loki’s lies, schemes and betrayals. Sometimes he does the right thing!

Evanescent

All text and photos by Meg

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Terrific Taranaki: Earth WPC

Gallery

This gallery contains 8 photos.

This week’s photo challenge is to celebrate “Earth.” I’ve holidayed in this part of New Zealand 9 times in the past 14 years. It’s just a hop across the “Ditch” from Australia. This Lonely Planet poster was in a fish … Continue reading

Stone Surprised: Weekly Photo Challenge

Surprise? Wonder? The unexpected? Stones surprise me. I can’t help being attracted to stones – as a three year old I happily spent summer hours digging holes in our back garden for them.

I don’t hoard stones – only have a couple at home that still ‘speak’ to me. Funny that.

Last year I had to photograph this beauty before I parted with it … gave it away as a Thank You note. The recipients were very gracious and said they’d put it in their garden.

It was the best one I’d found while I was walking along the shore at Glenelg, on Scotland’s west coast. I crunched along the rocky beach, looking over to Skye, listening to the soft swish of the water and the occasional sheep bleat from the hills. There wasn’t a soul around and then I looked down.DSCF4798

Look at all the stories in these stones. How did they get those marks? Where have they come from? How long ago? Is that a man’s face? What happened to him?  I spent another happy hour searching.

When the sun went in, I stumbled away with the stones I couldn’t leave behind in my pocket. DSCF4796

Stories are like that.

When I think of a story about surprises and stones, I recall a favourite Tibetan folktale, an initiation story, called The Boy, His Sisters, and The Magic Horse from Gioia Timpanelli’s collection. (I’ve mentioned this story before in an earlier post.)

An old hunter’s young son refused to kill any animal. Next morning the boy’s surprised when his father leads him to a freshly dug hole and tells him to get in. Although he’s very afraid, the son does as he’s told and his father slides a big stone over the top. His father then scrapes on it “Open or not as you please” and walks away.

After some hours, while the boy sits motionless, but for the tears down his cheeks, three monks come walking past. They see the sign on the stone which makes them curious and they stop. If anything, most stones would usually have ‘Om mani padme hum‘ written on them. The lamas debate what to do, agree to open it up and are surprised to see a boy looking up at them. They help him out and the boy’s adventures begin …

Surprise is an essential elements in any story…as well as in everyday life…just have to stay involved and pay attention…never know what might happen next…when you least expect it…all part of coming to terms with the certainty of uncertainty.

Surprise

Reference sources

Om mani padme hum. Wikipedia. Accessed 13 April 2017. (See photo of stone with this  inscription)

TIMPANELLI, Gioia. The Boy, His Sisters and the Magic Horse in Tales from the Roof of the World: Folktales of Tibet. New York, Viking, 1984. pp 3- 13. (NB. Tale is also known as ‘The Young Man Who Refused to Kill.)

All text and photos by Meg

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Sheltering Green : WPC

This week’s Photo Challenge reminded me of a Russian proverb “Everyman loves the tree that gives him shelter.” Last Fall, we had a leisurely walk around Green Lake. People were in the lake, on the lake but mainly, around the lake.

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Green shade is a blessed relief in our hot Australian summers. A local family of Boobook Owls have moved to smaller trees which give denser shade, so they can sleep better.

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Continue reading