Temporary? Weekly Photo Challenge

What’s not to appreciate? … a sundae special just waiting to be savoured …

 

… the latest plover mother in the place she was reared, sitting on eggs – no matter how often the mower goes by …

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… leaving no imprint behind, but a sense of having seen marvels …  able to revisit anytime, in our imagination. High days and holidays!IMG_4133 (1)

  1. Huckleberry ice cream.
  2. Masked Lapwing (Plover) nesting on spare Bowling Green.
  3. 14th – 16th Century marble intarsia (inlaid) make up the entire Siena Duomo floor. Covered in sheets to protect them from wear all year, except June 29 – July 31 & Aug 18 – Oct 26, when visitors can see them revealed, from temporary wooden walkways.

Moonstruck was one of my favourite movies. I recall Cosmo, father of the bride- to-be, reacting to the ring Loretta (Cher) was given with her latest marriage proposal. He thought it looked stupid because it was a man’s pinky ring.

She replied “It’s temporary.” At which he exclaimed, “Everything is temporary!  That don’t excuse nothin’.”

And for a story to make you think more about Temporary, you can’t go past It could Always Be Worse retold by Margo Zemach available for you to read as part of Teaching Children Philosophy, thanks to this Creative Commons Licence,

Temporary

All text and photos by Meg. Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and also Copyright © under Australian Law. Please request permission to copy photos.

 

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Have a Sticky Beak: WPC Peek

Staring out the kitchen window this morning, something in our tallest tree caught my eye. Got the camera out to ‘have a sticky beak’ – Aussie slang for ‘have a look.’

DSCF6769A young Maggie preens itself.

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 … then settles down for a branch snooze after a noisy morning. It’s been up since Dawn learning to carol and sing. Indigenous Peoples have called these birds Koorakoolas, Goorebats or Curlucks.

DSCF6783 (1)Shut-eye doesn’t last long.

An adult flies up. The young one squawks for food !

DSCF6811 Pa goes hunting!

Australian poet Judith Wright in her poem Magpies wrote

” they look like certain gentlemen

who seem most nonchalant and wise …

… their joy is long. For each is born with such a throat

as thanks his God with every note.

In my back garden, these magpies are content to amble. I followed Ma or Pa walking around till I got this last shot. They’ve never ‘dive-bombed” me like those magpies in parks, protecting their nests when people get too close.

Thank goodness for tall trees, singing birds and sticky beaks.

Peek

PS. I f you want to hear them ‘carolling,’ check out Youtube for videos of Australian Magpies. I might get up really early tomorrow and record them myself.

All text (except where noted) and photos by Meg. Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and also Copyright © under Australian Law.

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Refreshed: WPC Glow

Mushrooms glow after rain, or are they humming?

Mushrooms

Last week’s long downpour refreshed our neighbourhood. September was the driest in 20 years. Now the Jacarandas can really get ahead…

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 while local Galahs help their chicks find food for themselves.

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For many students, these blossoms herald final exam time … and perhaps, a sinking feeling.

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But, outdoors at last, these Kindy kids take turns…

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… excitedly shooting for goal in the Jacaranda Cup!

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PS. The day after I posted,  I spotted this glowing object by the walking track.

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Not another mushroom … an inside door handle sticking out of the ground. It makes you wonder how big the door is … and where it leads?

Glow

Galah

Jacaranda

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and also Copyright © under Australian Law. Please request permission to copy photos.

Window – One Year Apart:WPC

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28/9/16 – Dawn on the Hebridean island of Barra, after a night of heavy rain.

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28/9/17 – 8am. The window in the room where I blog … no rain for months.

Windows

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and also Copyright © under Australian Law. Please request permission to copy photos.

Lived-in Layers: Weekly Photo Challenge


Many of the two-storied, terraced houses in Sydney have a small frontage. From their front door they go long and deep.

Come in the back door and you can see all the way through the house – the studio, to the laundry, kitchen, sitting-room, along the hallway to the open front door.

The house is full of stories of the people and pets who have lived here or visited, as well as the builders and renovators who came and went – all that living and dreaming in layers of colour in stone, iron, tile and timber. 

Layered

…….

All text and photos by Meg

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License and also Copyright © under Australian Law. Please request permission to copy photos

Structure / Order: Weekly Photo Challenge

The challenge this week is ‘to share the structure of something that is typically overlooked.’

“What kind of flower is that?” I wonder, as I spy crumpled pink on the footpath.

“O, oh. Is it dead?” I zoom in.

A couple stops to find out what I’m photographing and before I can say anything to them about poisonous … , he’s picked up a broken branch to touch …

the spider … which grasps the proffered twig and hangs-on in mid-air, while being carried to a near-by tree.

Here it stays, held fast by eight skinny legs – an impressive structure!

Not really scared of spiders … am fascinated by their differences, their webs … their ingenuity and their persistence.

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Tiny spiders like these surely have a sense of humour –  ‘Moustache’ Spiders?

 

Structure

Story Twigs the Imagination! is a blog created by Meg Philp and Copyright © under Australian Law. 

Ooh! Shiny Curves! WPC

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Paris, Galeries Lafayette.

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Brisbane, Mount Cootha Botanic Gardens, Tropical Dome, lily pond.

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Len Lye Centre, New Plymouth, NZ.

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Edinburgh, National Museum of Scotland, Exhibit

For more on the Len Lye Centre, see earlier post Get a Wriggle on!

Ooh, Shiny!

All text and photos by Meg.

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

This blog of text and images is Copyright © under Australian Law.

Plant Life: WPC

This week’s Photo Challenge ‘Elemental” had me casting my eyes heavenwards … and then down to the window-sill. Elements of fire, earth, water and air are all captured here, as a winter sun pours into the house.

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Simply put,  Planet Earth thrives because of plants. They provide food, oxygen, medicine, and products, as well as creating and preserving the soil.

There’s a potted history in the three flower types this little posy -Violas were herbal medicine used by the Greeks as early as 4th Century B.C. Edible Nasturtiums were found in Mexico and Peru and taken back to Spain by the Conquistadors in the 16th century.  Petunias were also discovered about the same time in Argentina. Scots explorer James Tweedie sent purple ones back to the Edinburgh Royal Botanic Gardens in the 1830s.

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Plant collecting expanded with the British Empire. Edinburgh’s ‘Physic’ gardens and Royal Botanic Gardens flourished from 1653 on.

The British ‘landed gentry’ arranged the education of their off-spring in birth order. Their first son, as heir, was destined for university or would study law,  as might their second son.  Other younger sons would go into the Priesthood, the Military or  (Dear me!) Trade and apprenticeships. By the 1800s, with the expansion of the sciences like Botany in the Age of Enlightenment, a dedicated few became plant explorers, travelling to exotic places, Asia, Australasia,  and the Americas, they brought back rare species for the gardens of the great estates, like Crarae Garden in Argyll, Scotland.  There, you may walk amongst Nepalese, Chinese and Tibetan trees and shrubs sent back by botanist Reginald Farrer.

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Camellia, member of the Tea Family from China.

There’s so much about plants that is taken for granted – more stories to tell … Just grow some, water them, care for them!

For more info about the Golden Age of Botany, see PlantExplorers.com. There you’ll find out about how other intrepid explorers battled the elements to bring back rare specimens … See Joseph Banks (1743-1820) who sailed with Captain Cook … or Scotsman  George Forrest (1873 – 1922) from Falkirk, who discovered over 1200 plants in China, Tibet and Burma and then introduced hundreds of them into western cultivation.

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Superfoods

See also this List of gardener-botanist explorers of the Enlightenment


Sources

DAVIES, Amanda.The History of the Petunia in “Thompson & Morgan” (Blog) Feb 12, 2016. Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

Pansy. Aggie Horticulture, Texas AgriLife Extension Series. Downloaded 10 August 2017

PlantExplorers.com; the Adventure is Growing. Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

PERRY, Leonard. (Dr.) Nasturtium; a favourite old-fashioned flower. in “The Green Mountain Gardener.” University of Vermont Extension, Dept of Plant and Soil Science. Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

‘Reginald Farrer.’Wikiwand. Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

Wallis, Patrick (and) Webb, Cliff. The Education and Training of of Gentry Sons in Early Modern England. ISE, London, (forthcoming). Downloaded 10 August, 2017.

Elemental

All text and photos by Meg.

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

This blog of text and images is Copyright © under Australian Law.

Delta Pattern: Weekly Photo Challenge

A challenge to find one photo to illustrate this topic. Oh my!

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OK. After heavy rain last month, I spotted this pattern in silt from a run-off on the footpath. It’s a water splash. Or was I looking down on the planet from space? Guess.

Delta

All text and photo by Meg.

Story Twigs the Imagination! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

This blog of text and images is Copyright © under Australian Law.