Taking The Road

This week’s photo challenge is to show something that surprised or delighted me on the road taken.

(I do need to acknowledge the patience of friends & family when we’re driving along, & I suddenly call out from the backseat, “Stop! I need to take a photo.”)

dscf5052

In some traditional tales, taking to the road to seek their fortune was often the only way folk could solve their troubles.

In Norroway, long ago, there lived a widow and three daughters who were so poor that they barely had enough to keep body and soul together. One morning the eldest came to her mother and said, “Bake me a bannock and roast me a collop for I’m going to seek my fortune.”

Continue reading

Advertisements

How Mary Medlicott “twigs” on her Storyworks Blog

Here’s a great example of how Story “twigs” your imagination.

Mary is a longtime storyteller and author of several  compilations of stories and more. I have been following her blog for over a year now … and I learn so much.

Reblogged here with permission. Thanks, Mary

Thursday night, we went to see King Lear in the Royal Shakespeare Company production at the Barbican. It was hard and long and brilliant and Anthony Sher was a completely believable and utterly moving Lear. As his three daughters responded to his request to tell him how much they loved him, it was immediately clear…

via Storytelling Starters ~ Dear as Salt — Mary Medlicott’s Storyworks Blog

Australia Colours the Tale

As a storyteller, I do my best to see the story unfold in my imagination as I tell. A well-known American teller, Gioia Timpanelli, once said to me, “If you’re going to tell as story about an eagle, make sure you’ve had a real close look at one.”

Looking closely here in Oz, it’s colours that are especially striking –

Ficus Tree Pink, a sign of new growth.

IMG_2033

Sunset Mauve Flame, the colour of the Flame Child’s dress in Jospeph Jacob’s ” My Own Self”

DSCF0010

Aquamarine, on the edge of the sea, the place the farmer retired to in “J.Percy Cockatoo” by J.Bodger & M.Philp.

IMG_2008

Kelpie Cattle Dog Red in many a faithful, farm dog, tale.

DSCF0029Ancient Grass Tree Green.

IMG_1601

Soft Pelican White, where ‘his beak holds more than his belly can.’

DSCF0193

 Guava like watermelon – juicy, sweet-smelling tucker.

DSCF0201

Eucalyptus Speckle Bark on the “Galah Tree” where those pesky birds roost  in Jean Chapman’s tall tale of the same title.

IMG_1561 Silver Quandong Fruit Blue, the colour of the new eyes Vulture finds for Jaguar, in M.R. Macdonald’s “Little Crab with Magic Eyes”

IMG_1280Sugar Almond Sundown, the end to a perfect winter’s day.

DSCF0054

Don’t Forget to Remember

This post is for me. I’ve learned a few things the hard way in this blog.  There are steps I have to remember…

I had a strict Geography teacher in high school. I don’t remember his real name, for we all deferred to him as “Sir” quick- smart, or “Albert” with a nod towards his room, amongst ourselves. His star turn was to give a hundred lines if we forgot anything for class … and the line was “I must remember not to forget to remember to bring my geography equipment at the appropriate times.” I only ever forgot once.

Posting a blog I need to remember to –

Make backup copies of all the photos and text I create. Double-up if necessary.

IMG_1029

Aim for the target , but expect to be distracted.

DSCF0019
Avoid typing when ruffled, especially early in the morning.

DSCF0068Keep me eyes peeled when I’m out and about.

DSCF0025Always take a camera. I never know who I might meet.

IMG_1969

Try not to be a dragon with the details.

IMG_1699

Remember life is risk and dare. But be wary of the delete button.

Yes. I’m on this raft and that’s another story!

IMG_1022

Don’t take it all so seriously,

IMG_1032

and always stop for a celebratory cuppa, before I hit “Publish!”

IMG_0373

What have I forgotten? Reminders welcome!

All photos and text by Meg

Story Twigs …! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Throw-away Lines

IMG_1024 Both my grandfathers signed up for Highland regiments and survived WW1.

As a child, I have a memory of watching my maternal grandmother, ironing on her wooden board in the kitchen and her telling me that the worst ironing job was my grandfather’s kilt when he was home on leave from the Front. This was a confusing idea for me. I’d seen how a  kilt was made.

IMG_1026

 “The lice in it, “she explained. “I had to use the iron, pressing hard up and down the seams on his kilt . You’d hear the crunching as you ironed. Then, it was out to the wash-house, lots of soap, and some would float out then. But it was after the kilt had dried on the line, I’d poke them out each folded seam with a knitting needle.  It took a while. Then I’d press the kilt for him and off he’d go back to the war.”

My aunt knows more family history than I ever will. As a daughter –in-law, she was close to my father’s shy parents, and is a great talker. On the phone this week, I asked about what she knew about my paternal grandfather’s experiences in WW1.

 “Oh …  “ she said. “It was never talked about at home,” she sighed. “It was all too terrible“ Then she giggled, and quipped “He and a mate chipped in and bought a monkey when they were in France. “

“Why, for goodness sake?” I asked. Still laughing, she replied. “It picked the lice off their kilts!”

That line has haunted me since. I see a little, nervous monkey, among the horrors of war, picking away at tartan seams.

Have you ever had a throw-away line grab you like that?

All text and photos by Meg

Story Twigs …! by Meg Philp is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.